FOR HER 80TH BIRTHDAY SHE GOT HERSELF A HARLEY

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PHOTOS BY MARY LYNN CRAMER

 

“What do you think of my new wheels? When I was 13, my boyfriend had a Harley 125; I rode in back – now in front!”

Mary Lynn Cramer of Arlington/Cambridge Massachusetts, has been a political activist for at least sixty years.

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Beloved of Allah: the Most Beautiful Man

Eléctrica in the Desert

aliBoy

When Ali refused the draft, I felt something greater than pride: I felt as though my honor as a black boy had been defended, my honor as a human being… The day he refused, I cried in my room. I cried for him and for myself, for my future and for his, for all our black possibilities.

Gerald Early

AliNationofIslam

With the Nation of Islam, listening to the Prophet Elijah Muhammed

malcom_x_-muhammad-ali

With his friend, Minister Malcolm X

“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No I’m not going 10,000 miles from home to help murder and burn another poor nation simply to continue the domination of white slave masters of the darker people the world over. This…

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Under Uraguay’s Dictatorship

Eléctrica in the Desert

Eduardo_galeano_Art

                                                    EDUARDO GALEANO
                                       CELEBRATION OF THE HUMAN VOICE/2
 
 
“Their hands were tied or handcuffed, yet their fingers danced,  flew, drew words. The prisoners were hooded, but leaning back, they could  see a bit, just a bit, down below. Although it was forbidden to speak, they spoke with their hands. Pinio Ungerfeld taught me the finger alphabet, which he had learned in prison without a teacher:
 
“Some of us had bad handwriting ,” he told me. ” Others  were masters of calligraphy .”
 
The Uruguayan dictatorship wanted everyone to stand  alone, everyone to be no one: in prison and barracks, and throughout the country…

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The Town that Fought ICE

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MORRISTOWN, Tenn. — One morning in April, federal immigration agents swept into a meatpacking plant in this northeastern Tennessee manufacturing town, launching one of the biggest workplace raids since President Trump took office with a pledge to crack down on illegal immigration.

Dozens of panicked workers fled in every direction, some wedging themselves between beef carcasses or crouching under bloody butcher tables. About 100 workers, including at least one American citizen, were rounded up — every Latino employee at the plant, it turned out, save a man who had hidden in a freezer.

The raid occurred in a state that is on the raw front lines of the immigration debate. Mr. Trump won 61 percent of the vote in Tennessee, and continues to enjoy wide popularity. The state’s rapidly growing immigrant population, now estimated to total more than 320,000, has become a favorite target of the Republican-controlled State Legislature. In 2017, Tennessee lawmakers passed the nation’s first law requiring stiffer sentences for defendants who are in the country illegally. In April, they passed a law requiring the police to help enforce immigration laws and making it illegal for local governments to adopt so-called sanctuary policies.

File:Downtown Morristown Tennessee Overhead Sidewalks.JPG

But Morristown, a town of 30,000 northeast of Knoxville that was the boyhood home of Davy Crockett, has drawn migrant workers from Latin America since the early 1990s, when they first came to work on the region’s abundant tomato farms. As stepped-up security has made going back and forth across the border more difficult, many of these families have settled into the community, enrolled their kids in school, and joined churches where they have baptized their American-born children.

So the day Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents raided the Southeastern Provision plant outside the city and sent dozens of workers to out-of-state detention centers was the day people in Morristown began to ask questions many hadn’t thought through before — to the federal government, to the police, to their church leaders, to each other.

Donations of food, clothing and toys for families of the workers streamed in at such volume there was a traffic jam to get into the parking lot of a church. Professors at the college extended a speaking invitation to a young man whose brother and uncle were detained in the raid. Schoolteachers cried as they tried to comfort students whose parents were suddenly gone. There was standing room only at a prayer vigil that drew about 1,000 people to a school gym.

Here, based on interviews with dozens of workers and townspeople, and in their own words (some edited for length and clarity), is how it happened.

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ANGELA SMITH, 42, A LONGTIME RESIDENT OF THE AREA: My first thought was one of sorrow. Oh my goodness, this is going to hurt so many people in the community. It’s going to hurt their kids, our kids. It’s going to have a ripple effect throughout the entire community because these people are part of Morristown. Immediately, I drive over to the parish center to see what I can do to help. I had to park way at the end because it was so packed. I go in, I said, I’m an attorney, how can I help?

The April 5 operation signaled a return to the high-profile immigration raids that last happened during the presidency of George W. Bush. President Barack Obama’s chief workplace enforcement tactic was to conduct payroll audits and impose fines on businesses found to employ unauthorized workers. The Trump administration, on the other hand, has vowed to quintuple worksite enforcement. Last week, ICE agents arrested 114 employees at two worksites operated by a gardening company in Ohio.

All 97 workers taken into custody in the Tennessee raid now face deportation, though several have been released pending hearings. And much of the town is reeling. Up to 160 American-born children have a parent who could soon be ordered to leave the country; many families are relying on handouts.

Nataly Luna, 12, whose father, Reniel, was detained in the raid, at a march through downtown Morristown on April 12. Charles Mostoller for The New York Times

NATALY LUNA, 12, WHOSE FATHER WAS DETAINED: My mom had told us one day it could happen, that one day one of them would be taken. The hardest thing is talking about it.

After the raid, immigrant advocates organized a peace march, and Nataly carried a sign bearing the image of her father, a native of Mexico who had been working in the United States without papers for 20 years before he was taken into custody at the meat plant that day. “We Miss You,” the sign read. “We need you by our side. You are the best father.”

The Town

Nestled between two mountain ranges and flanked by two large lakes, Morristown is the county seat and industrial hub of Hamblen County, where most of the plant workers’ families reside.

The Latinos who arrived here, especially those who came after the late 1990s, were part of a swelling wave of migrants bypassing traditional gateway states like California and Texas to seek opportunity in the fast-growing South. Word reached their villages that jobs were plentiful.

More recently, as with other places, Tennessee has been struggling with a meth and opioid epidemic. As drug abuse has sidelined many working-age American men and women, local employers have increasingly turned to immigrants.

KATIE CAHILL, A RESEARCHER WHO STUDIES PUBLIC HEALTH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE, KNOXVILLE: Tennessee is facing one of the highest rates of opioid addiction among states. Within this challenged state, you have a county that is doing even worse.

These days, Latinos make up about 11 percent of Hamblen County’s population and account for one of every four students in its public schools. Immigrants toil in meat, poultry and canning plants, as well as at automotive parts, plastics and other factories that dot the area.

MARSHALL RAMSEY, PRESIDENT OF THE MORRISTOWN AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: We don’t get into immigration issues. As long as they are pulling their weight as workers, that is what we appreciate. We’re very proud of our diverse heritage. My wife is actually a seventh-grade schoolteacher here in town and about 50 percent of her class is Hispanic. She raves about parent-teacher conferences. The parents show up. The kids know that the parents have high expectations of them. The parents feel like the kids have been given an opportunity.

Not everyone in town has been welcoming, though. One theme many expressed: The workers were lawbreakers who got caught. In the parking lot of the local Walmart, where several people were talking about the raid at the meat plant, one woman said it could open up employment opportunities. But not everyone agreed with her.

CAROL JONES, A RETIRED NURSING HOME WORKER : Send them back. There will be jobs for Americans, if they get off their butts.

CHARLES ATKINSON, A RETIRED TRUCK DRIVER : You can’t get no Americans to work on the farm or nothing. Mexicans get right in there and do the work.

The Plant

Undocumented workers from Mexico and Guatemala formed the backbone of the work force at Southeastern Provision, located 10 miles north of Morristown in the town of Bean Station. They killed, skinned, decapitated and cut up cattle whose parts were used for, among other things, oxtail soup and a cured meat snack exported to Africa.

Immigrants were critical to the family-owned abattoir’s growth over the last decade. Many of those affected by the raid, fearing further action from the authorities, spoke on the condition that only their first names be used.

A closed taco truck outside a trailer park where a number of the immigrant families live. Charles Mostoller for The New York Times

ELISABETH, 38, WHOSE HUSBAND WAS DETAINED IN THE RAID : He worked there for nine years. When he started, there were only around 10 people. The plant expanded thanks to the Hispanics. It was hard work. He would come home tired and say, ‘We killed 300 cows today.’ In the early years, they’d kill only 15 cows a day. A few months ago, the workers were talking about striking for better pay and work conditions.

With the $11.50 hourly wage that her husband, Tomas, made at the plant and the $9 she earns as a seamstress, Elisabeth and her family could afford the $700 rent for a house big enough to accommodate their six children, three from her previous marriage, and live a relatively stable life, she said. To be sure, the work was heavy, gory and low-paying. Day after day, the workers endured the smell of manure, blood and flesh. But Southeastern Provision offered a major advantage over other businesses: The management, several workers said, didn’t seem to expect them to bother with fake work authorization documents.

ALMA, 35, A NATIVE OF MEXICO WHO WORKED AT THE PLANT FOR TWO YEARS:It was the one place where we could get work using our real names. I made $10 an hour. My job was to operate a big machine that takes the nails out of the hooves and one that slices the skin from the cows’ faces.

Federal authorities said there was evidence that the company had run afoul of the law. In an affidavit, the Internal Revenue Service said the company had withdrawn millions of dollars in cash and told bank employees the money was needed to pay “Hispanics”— suggesting that the company knew it was hiring undocumented workers and evaded payment of federal employment taxes.

An informant hired at the plant in 2017 told investigators that workers felt they couldn’t complain about poor working conditions because of their immigration status. Some had to work unpaid overtime, the informant reported. He said he saw others required to work with “extremely harsh” chemicals without protective eyewear.

A closed Morristown store that sold dresses for quinceañera celebrations. Charles Mostoller for The New York Times

STEPHANIE TEATRO, CO-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE TENNESSEE IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE RIGHTS COALITION: So far, it has been the workers who have borne all the consequences of the employer’s violations. ICE could have decided to audit this employer, and forced him to pay fines and correct his practices. Instead they conducted a raid that left over 160 children without a parent from one day to the next.

No charges have been filed against the company. A federal criminal investigation is ongoing, said Bryan Cox, an ICE spokesman. The owner, James Brantley, said he couldn’t talk about the case. His lawyer, Norman McKellar, also declined to comment. “We are in a difficult situation,” he said.

The Raid

It was just after 9 a.m., about two hours after more than 100 workers had arrived for the 7 a.m. shift, when shouts of “inmigración, inmigración” rang out across the plant.

Alma went numb. In the cutting line, another worker, Raymunda, put down the butcher’s knife she was holding and raced toward an exit. So did dozens of others, their blood-smeared smocks and protective aprons weighing them down. They soon realized that ICE agents, backed by state law enforcement, blocked every door.

Agents cornered and grabbed workers, sometimes barking “Calma!” in Spanish to those who cried and screamed. Some workers reported that agents pointed guns at them to stop them from fleeing. “I stuck myself between the cows,” Raymunda said. It was to no avail.

RAYMUNDA: We didn’t come here to kill or to steal. We came here purely to work. I have a sister and we were both picked up at the same time.

Within minutes, all the Latinos at the plant were rounded up, including at least one American citizen and several other people who had legal authorization to work.

ONE OF THE WORKERS WHO IS AN AMERICAN CITIZEN: An officer with an ICE vest on grabbed me by my shoulder. He grabbed me and wouldn’t let me go. I told him he was hurting me and he told me to shut up. They were grabbing people however. For me, basically all the Hispanics because of their color were handcuffed. The white people just stood there.

Immigrants who were lined up, many of them crying, tried to give the woman messages to pass to their loved ones, because they knew she was an American and, therefore, likely to be freed.

THE AMERICAN CITIZEN: When I tried to talk to workers in the line, they put metal handcuffs on me that bruised me. When I told them I am American, they asked me, where are your documents? I said I had them in my car. When I told them that, they asked me, why don’t you carry your documents? I told them I don’t carry my documents with me because where we work is very dirty. I use a squeegee to clean the blood off the floor in the killing room.

In groups of about a dozen, according to several workers interviewed, Latinos were placed mainly in plastic handcuffs, escorted to white vans with tinted windows and transported to a National Guard Armory. A helicopter hovered above.

Word began to spread that “la migra,” as ICE is known, was in the area. Panicked immigrants walked off the job at other companies in the region and frantically texted each other.

The National Guard Armory in Morristown. Charles Mostoller for The New York Times

VERONICA GALVAN, 29, A WELL-KNOWN FIGURE IN THE LATINO COMMUNITY: I started getting message after message. Is immigration in town? Do you know? I started going through my news feed. I need to find out, especially because my mom works at one of these plants. I pull up to the armory. All these text messages were coming. Are you there? Are you there? Please tell me something, I am desperate. The first thing I thought was, I am going to livestream it on my Facebook.

Ms. Galvan described how she arrived to a crowd amassed behind yellow police tape surrounding the armory, as state troopers stood guard. Relatives of plant workers were crying and obsessively checking their cellphones for news.

Inside, workers said they waited hours to be interviewed and fingerprinted by agents, a process delayed by computer glitches. When agents asked women who had young children to identify themselves, virtually every hand went up.

By late afternoon, agents had released only a handful of people, mainly those in frail health or who had proven they had the legal right to work in the United States.

ANGELA KANIPE, A THIRD-GRADE TEACHER AND BUS DRIVER : Two non-Hispanic kids on the bus were having a conversation about how they were worried about their friends. And they were talking about how God was going to be mad because he doesn’t want you to be mean to people. Why would someone take away someone’s parents? When I think about it, it just breaks my heart. It’s hard not to cry.

JOHNNY GALLARDO, 15, RAYMUNDA’S SON : I saw a lot of Hispanic kids crying in the hall at school. I called my dad and asked, ‘Are you O.K.?’ He said, ‘I’m O.K., but this thing happened to your mom.’ I went to soccer practice like he told me. I tried to take my mind off it. I just played. I have a goal. I want to go to college. Could my dream be destroyed by this?

In the evening, Johnny headed to the armory with his father and 7-year-old sister, Brittany, who was weeping. They brought insulin injections to be delivered to his mother, who is diabetic.

Families were gathering in an elementary school across from the armory. By nightfall, about 100 people, including teachers, clergy, lawyers and other community members had assembled. Volunteers distributed pizza, tamales and drinks.

JEFF PERRY, SUPERINTENDENT OF HAMBLEN COUNTY SCHOOLS: I got a call from some of our staff members that they had detained several of the parents at the armory. So we had several hundred people beside the road of the armory. As the numbers grew, the situation became more and more dangerous. We provided access to a school facility to keep folks safe. A lot of our administrators were there, several of our principals there to comfort kids.

As the night wore on, about 30 of the detainees, including Raymunda and Alma, were gradually released.

A little after 1 a.m., the agents announced that no one else would be let go. Workers still in detention — 54 in all — were put on buses to Alabama and then Louisiana.

ELISABETH : I was hoping my husband would be freed. Others came out. But my husband never came out. My husband never came. They have ruined our family. He is a good person. He never mistreated me. He cared for my three older children as if they were his own. My favorite moment was when we all sat together to dinner, blessed the meal and shared our day with each other: What did you do, how was school? We all talked about our day.

IRVIN ROMAN, 21, ELISABETH’S SON: He helped with everything. Now, I have to literally step into his shoes.

Irvin Roman, 21, whose stepfather was detained in the raid, cleaning his family’s home. Charles Mostoller for The New York Times

The Church

St. Patrick Catholic Church’s parish center was converted into a crisis response center. All day, people arrived with food, clothing, toys and supplies for the affected families. At one point, six trucks waited to unload donations.

Volunteers, who showed up by the dozens, received color-coded tags: Yellow for teachers, white for lawyers, and pink for general helpers, who prepared meals in the kitchen, packed grocery bags and performed other tasks.

Bleary-eyed immigrants packed the main room. In smaller rooms, teachers entertained children with stories while their parents received legal services.

COLLEEN JACOBS, A YOUTH MINISTRY COORDINATOR : There was definitely crying, but you could tell you were in a place of people of faith. You still felt love and connection, more than you felt sadness and despair.

Members of other churches turned up to help, some bearing gift cards and checks.

DAVID WILLIAMS, PASTOR AT HILLCREST BAPTIST CHURCH : As a minister of the Gospel, my concern is for affected families and especially the innocent children. These people are my neighbors and live in my community. Our congregation as well as the community is divided on the issue. I try to keep it humanitarian, not political, and certainly not racial!

On Topix , a community website where comments are posted anonymously, one person asked, “Why does St. Patrick Catholic Church support law breakers?”

Another person wrote, “This bust is legal, the people are illegals. Why the big sympathy case? I don’t get it.”

Still, a couple of days later, “we had more volunteers than we knew what to do with. We had to turn people away,” Ms. Jacobs said.

At a news conference, faith leaders and Elisabeth, surrounded by her sons, pleaded for the community to pray for the immigrants.

ELISABETH : I have been here 20 years. All my children were born here. We came here for a better future. We didn’t come to steal or to take anyone’s job. Please help all our families. Pray. Pray a lot.

Hundreds of children missed school after the raid. On the evening of April 7, about 120 teachers and school staff packed the church’s basement to talk about how to assist students. On a poster board, they scrawled their feelings. “I cried Thursday night wondering which of my students were without parents that night,” one teacher wrote. “I feel helpless,” wrote another.

Food donated to families affected by the raid filled a Sunday school classroom at St. Patrick Church. Charles Mostoller for The New York Times

JORDYN HORNER, A SCHOOL LIBRARIAN, ON FACEBOOK : These past two days have been the hardest of my career and I wasn’t prepared. Finding ways to comfort your students who are in tears, upset, angry, and afraid is nearly impossible.

On Monday, three days after the raid, a prayer vigil at Hillcrest Elementary School drew nearly 1,000 people who sat in the bleachers, in folding chairs on the court and, when the chairs ran out, they stood along the walls. A 16-year-old named Ramon stood up to speak.

RAMON : I want to see my mother again. My mother is the only person I have. I live alone now.

Two nights later, St. Patrick Church’s center still brimmed with activity as immigrants and supporters gathered to make posters and banners for a procession through downtown Morristown. Ms. Smith brought her 8-year-old daughter, Laurel, figuring it was an important lesson. “This community is a snapshot of the dissonance of America on immigration,” Ms. Smith said.

At Walters State Community College, instructors gathered in an auditorium to hear Jehova Arzola, 20, an engineering honors student whose brother and uncle were detained, describe his family’s ordeal. No one knew when, or if, they would see them again, he said.

JEHOVA ARZOLA: At any time ICE can come and get you. It doesn’t matter if you are a criminal or law-abiding. They don’t care. The whole community is afraid to leave their houses and go to work. They are afraid there will be another raid.

Families impacted by the raid and local supporters marched through downtown Morristown last month. Charles Mostoller for The New York Times

The Procession

On Thursday, a week after the raid, about 300 people took to Morristown’s downtown streets in the evening to draw attention to the plight of the families. Some people, like Colin Loring and his partner, Margaret Durgin, drove for an hour to participate.

“We are here to support our immigrant neighbors. The system needs to be fixed,” said Mr. Loring, who is retired from the United States Department of Agriculture. Ms. Durgin arrived with a $540 check to help the immigrants.

Before setting out, a nun led the marchers, who wore white and clutched white flowers, in prayer. “We love Morristown. We are here to send a message of love and unity,” they chanted before heading down Main Street. Along the way, a driver shouted an expletive at the crowd from inside his brown truck and sped off.

Pulling to the front of the line was Raymunda, her youngest children, Johnny, 15, and Brittany, 7, by her side. She said she had a notice to appear in court for deportation proceedings.

RAYMUNDA: The truth is, we don’t know what is going to happen next. We have fear, a lot of fear. What else can I say? My husband is incredibly scared. My greatest fear in the world is to have to leave my children.

 

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O’Brien’s Big Retrospective

Eléctrica in the Desert

Rio Grande Post 3317 / Claire O’Brien   2015

Hay Barn off New Mexico I-25     Claire O’Brien  2015

Motel off I-25

Diesel Out Back / Claire O’Brien 2010

Desert Highway stop 1 JPG Journado De La Muerto / Claire O’Brien 2014

At home in this world with the Early Bird Cafe / CLAIRE O'BRIEN 2012

Passing Through / Claire O’Brien / 2014

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ohPatti

Eléctrica in the Desert

New York City,1978 / Kevin Cummins
You will see us coming, V formation through the sky.
 
Take arms. Take aim. Be without shame:
No one to bow to, to vow to, to blame.
 
 
From ‘Til Victory, “Easter”, 1978
  
ChelseaΘHotel, NYC, Θ1968, Robert Mapplethorpe
 
There must be something I can dream tonight.
All the fire is frozen, yet still – I have the will.
Trumpets, violins, I hear them in the distance –
and my skin emits a ray,
But I think it’s sad, it’s much too bad
that our friends can’t come back to us today.
 
From Elegie, “Horses”, 1975
051-patti-smith-theredlist
 1977, NYC, Robert Mapplethorpe
 
1990/ No photo info
” You just keep doing your work because that’s what you are called
to do. No artist can expect to be embraced by the people; even if it seems like no one…

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MASTERS OF WAR

Eléctrica in the Desert

Joan_Baez_Bob_Dylan_______________________________________________________________________________

Come you masters of war –
You that build the big guns,
You that build the death planes,
You that build all the bombs.
You that hide behind walls
You that hide behind desks
I just want you to know
I can see through your masks.

_______________________________

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You that never done nothin’
But build to destroy
You play with my world
Like it’s your little toy

But I see through your eyes
And I see through your brain
Like I see through the water
That runs down my drain.

israelkilling53

_____________________________ 

Let me ask you one question
Is your money that good
Will it buy you forgiveness?
Do you think that it could?
I think you will find
When your death takes its toll
All the money you made
Will never buy back your soul.

______________________________

1405373023187

And I hope that you die
And your death’ll come soon
I will follow…

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On the Backs of an Empire

Why I hate: this is a Bengali woman carrying a British motherfucker on her back at the height of Empire.

 

RAMADAN MUBARAK

 

EGYPT

 

PALESTINE

 

 

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CAIRO

 

INDONESIA

 

CHINA

               

 

      __________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gina Haspel and the Normalising of Torture

Preface by Claire O’Brien

Let this be where we stop them. Let’s go no further. We must hound Haspel relentlessly, daily, making it impossible for her to function. Set up 24 hour protest sites as close to the Justice Dept, Congress, and the White House, her home and her church as we can get. Everyone who deals with her, every university visit, every lecture, every meeting, every member of her personal staff gets flooded with public outrage. WE SAY NO, WE SAY NO AND WE KEEP SAYING NO.
Reblogging on Electrica in the Desert

OffGuardian

by Kit

This all happened by accident. This isn’t who we are. We didn’t mean it. Honest.

Gina Haspel is almost certainly going to be the next director of the CIA. This shouldn’t happen, but it will.

For those unfamiliar: Haspel was deputy head of the Agency under now-secretary of state Mike Pompeo. But that wasn’t her first job. She also oversaw the CIA torture programme in a secret black-site in Thailand. In 2005 she was promoted (probably because she’s really good at torturing people), and was then in charge of the CIA’s global network of torture sites.

This makes her a terrible person, but probably quite a good CIA agent.

Just to be clear, this is not a theory a rumor or a smear. Nobody debates these facts. This was her job. She supervised torture camps.

The response in the press is pretty disheartening, to be honest. Or, at…

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