Disappearances of Mexican Youth Increases by 200 Percent

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According to new data released on Thursday by the Mexican Network for Children’s Rights or REDIM disappearances among adolescents increased by 191 percent between 2012 and 2014.

The new figures, which were obtained through the government’s National Registry of Missing Persons database, revealed the disturbing trend that girls between the ages of 15 and 17 are disproportionately affected by enforced disappearances.

According to REDIM, seven out of 10 of missing children are girls between the ages of 15 and 17.

“These are the highest numbers we have seen for this age group since 2006,” REDIM President Alicia Vargas stated.

In its report, REDIM attributed the rise in child disappearances to criminal organizations involved in human trafficking and the ongoing “war on drugs” waged between Mexican security forces and drug trafficking organizations.

RELATED: Mexico Military Spending Soars as Human Rights Situation Worsens

According to official figures, almost 50 percent of the 22,322 disappeared people in Mexico went missing between 2012 and 2014 under the current administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto.

During a press conference on Thursday, REDIM Executive Director Juan Martín Pérez also called on the Mexican government to adopt preventative measures to help curb killings among Mexican youth.

“We are still far from 2012, which was when violence in our country reached its peak, but we are still concerned that federal authorities are not taking preventative measures to address violent killings,” Perez stated.
“http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Disappearances-of-Mexican-Youth-Increases-by-200-Percent–20160107-0036.html”.

 

 

New threats challenge Mexico’s Teotihuacán

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LatinaLista — Mexico’s pyramid Teotihuacán is not just a popular tourist destination and iconic symbol of Mexico’s significance in the annals of ancient history but it’s also an archeological treasure living on borrowed time.

Located 25 miles northeast of Mexico City, Teotihuacán is a pre-Columbian Mesoamerican city renown for its long-standing structures and well-preserverd murals. However, restorers from the country’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) reveal a sad reality: “Forty percent of the murals have disappeared or have been damaged in the past decade.”

Speaking to the Mexican newspaper Excelsior, the restorers attribute the loss of the murals to three things: the use of inadequate techniques in the past, budget constraints and urbanization. ”

As an example of the decline, the restorers cite an area in Teotihuacán known as Atetelco, “where a decade ago there were at least 100 murals, of which 78 have already been lost.” On top of that, anonymous sources tell the newspaper that of the 80 murals removed from the site in the 1960s and placed at the Teotihuacán mural museum, the majority of them are not in a perfect state of conservation.

Though existing murals are disappearing, the good news is that new ones are being discovered. A new mural was found last November in the southwestern corner of the Palace of Quetzalpapálotl, painted between 250 and 300 AD. The new mural is exciting researchers because it shows a procession of several warriors with unique characteristics, namely a distinct bundle carried on the bodies of the warriors and which archeologists have found in the Mayan area.

However, though the discovery of new murals may be able to replace the disappearance of others, there’s nothing that can replace the pyramids of Teotihuacán when they disappear. In March, New Scientist reported reported that Mexican scientists found that the largest of the complex’s pyramids, the Pyramid of the Sun, was in danger of collapsing like a “sand castle.”

The pyramid is covered with three million tons of volcanic rock built around an interior of nothing more than a “mound of earth.” On a quest to find interior chambers, the scientists didn’t find any in the Pyramid of the Sun but did discover that “the density of the earth in the pyramid is at least 20 percent lower on one side than the other.”

The consequence is that unless something is done the pyramid is in danger of collapsing in the future — and taking with it a window into humankind’s history

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Stopping Monsanto in Mexico

Without Corn There Is No Country:

Stopping Monsanto in Mexico

by  Abby Zimet, staff writer ,  COMMON DREAMS

A bit of good news from Mexico, which insists on throwing pesky little wrenches into Monsanto’s massive reckless  science experiment on the rest of us: Mexico’s Federal Court has upheld a 2013 ruling by Judge Marroquín Zaleta suspending the granting of licenses for GMO corn field trials sought by Monsanto and other Big-Ag colleagues, citing the environmental risks to over 7,000 years of indigenous maize cultivation and the country’s resulting 60 varieties of corn. The Zaleta ruling, which prompted Monsanto not just to appeal but to embark (in vain) on an effort to get him off the bench, is the latest victory in what many view as Ground Zero in the fight against GMO infestation. After protests by Mayan farmers, beekeepers, a biodiversity commission and other groups, a Mexican judge just ruled to withdraw a Monsanto permit to plant GMO soybeans  in seven states – over 625,000 acres – citing the threat posed to honey production in the Yucatán peninsula, and another judge rejected a GMO maize license request by Syngenta. Bravo to Stop the Crop, Greenpeace and others convincing those in power to “go off script” and stop Monsanto.

Todo lo Que Tengo es Tuyo / All That I Have is Yours

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In Chiapas, Mexico

 

Todo lo que tengo es tuyo,

Esta canción para que do se quieran.

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All that I have is yours.

This song is for love of  one another.

Jorge Lujan, from Con el Sol en Los Ojos/With the Sun in my Eyes

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Photo from Dorset Chiapas Solidarity/April 2014 Zapatista News Summary via wordpress.com


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WE MAKE THE ROAD BY WALKING

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“Hacemos el camino por caminando/ We make the road by walking”  Paulo Freire

Children in Oaxaca, Mexico, march to protest government violence against indigenous peoples. Each cross bears the name of a victim.

MEXICO CALLS OFF SEARCH FOR MISSING MIDDLE CLASS / DATELINE: THE TWILIGHT ZONE

THE COUNCIL FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS INVENTS A NATION;

 
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      THE LAST SEARCH PARTY DEPLOYED TO LOOK FOR THE HUGE MEXICAN MIDDLE CLASS RECENTLY DISCOVERED BY AN AMERICAN THINK TANK RETURNED TO THE NATION’S CAPITAL EMPTY HANDED YESTERDAY. THE NEW YORK-BASED COUNCIL FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS HAD NO SPECIFIC SUGGESTIONS REGARDING THE EXACT LOCATION OF THE MAJORITY OF MEXICO’S POPULATION. / Claire O’Brien 2012

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